Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Master Thesis

“Never in my life did I live as free as now”: Unbalanced Sex Ratio and Temporary Female Empowerment. A comparative study of the seventeenth-century Chesapeake and Gold Rush California

Abstract : When English immigrants left their homes for the Chesapeake colonies in the seventeenth century, they were searching for quick wealth and social mobility, as did forty-niners who left the East of the United States for California after the discovery of gold in 1848. One important similarity between these two migrations, which is the main focus of this study, is the female empowerment offered by these migration-based and rapidly-evolving societies. By describing the different forms of empowerment experienced by women and their interactions with the environment, this master’s thesis argues that the opportunities linked to tobacco cultivation and gold mining resulted in the creation of predominantly-male and unstable societies, which in turn led to temporary exceptional opportunities and independence for women regarding marriage, courtship, family, work and daily lives. This female empowerment, tightly linked to the unbalanced sex ratio and instability, gradually disappeared along with the establishment of more stable societies.
Document type :
Master Thesis
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [189 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://dumas.ccsd.cnrs.fr/dumas-02135781
Contributor : Uga - Ufr de Langues Étrangères <>
Submitted on : Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - 3:32:31 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, October 14, 2020 - 4:18:28 AM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : dumas-02135781, version 1

Citation

Camille Marion. “Never in my life did I live as free as now”: Unbalanced Sex Ratio and Temporary Female Empowerment. A comparative study of the seventeenth-century Chesapeake and Gold Rush California. Humanities and Social Sciences. 2019. ⟨dumas-02135781⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

112

Files downloads

170